Reese Witherspoon’s daughter said her mum was “mean”

Reese Witherspoon

In further proof that not all celebrities see their kids through rose coloured glasses, Reese Witherspoon has outed herself as a ‘real talk’ kind of mum.

Not a bed of roses

It’s refreshing – and a little reminiscent of Jessica Alba’s recent admission that she’s raising her kids to work hard, be kind and not take their privilege for granted.

Reese is mum to 18-year-old Ava, 15-year-old Deacon and 6-year-old Tennessee. Speaking to Fast Company, Reese said she’s got no time for the whole “blessed parent” movement and is keen to see more honest parenting (and chatter about the challenging realities of growing small people into adults.)

Reese is taking a pragmatic approach to raising her own kids, avoiding casting them as “golden children”.

“I feel like I’m constantly counteracting pressure from the parents who want to make the lives of their kids golden and magical at all moments!” Reese said, noting she was keen to provide a dose of perspective to ready her kids for life ahead.

“Guess what, kids?” the actor/producer mum warned with refreshing candour. “You’re going to be disappointed and uncomfortable once in a while.”


  Read more about Reese Witherspoon:


“Mean or true?”

Reese has been walking this talk for quite some time, it would seem. She shared a throwback story about her daughter Ava (who is now 18) recalling that when her eldest was in the third grade she gently imparted a giant dose of truth serum to the sobbing girl.

Reese said Ava was crying in bed because everyone on her basketball team had scored … except for her.

“I said, ‘Aves, maybe you’re bad at basketball’,” Reese recalls. “She thought that was mean. I said, ‘Mean or true? ‘Cause, guess what? Your mom’s bad at basketball, too.'”

Ouch. And yet … What might seem a little harsh at first glance is really more of a rally for resilience. Not everyone is good at everything and we very often will fail. Surely failing in good company is not such a terrible thing?

The lessons we learn when we talk about our strengths and weaknesses mean we’re better prepared for future challenges – and ensure we know ourselves and grow ourselves a little better too!

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