Facebook to alert parents if child’s photo is about to go public

Parents posting photos of their children to Facebook will soon be warned if the image can be seen by the general public.

The social network’s engineering boss has revealed that advances in artificial intelligence mean Facebook will be able to better analyse content of the uploaded images and warn the account holder as a safety measure.

Facebook’s vice president of engineering, Jay Parikh, called it “a 10-year arc of innovation”, which will track the two billion photographs uploaded to the site every day.

It will then alert users if photos of family members are about to be made public, and also make it easier for Facebook to remove “objectionable content” automatically, the Evening Standard reports.

“If I were to upload a photo of my kids playing at the park and I accidentally had it shared with the public, this system could say: ‘Hey wait a minute, this is a photo of your kids, normally you post this to just your family members, are you sure you want to do this?’ ” Mr Parikh says.

“I think [it’s] a nice intelligent way for us to help you manage all of the data and the information around you, and that could be just helping you process this stuff and getting it right the first time.”

Mr Parikh says there are ways to keep Facebook safe, including “very intelligent systems” that can weed out objectionable content faster.

Deep learning will also give blind and visually impaired Facebook users a better experience via a question and answer system that tells the user who is in a photograph, where the subject is and what they are doing.

Until then, have a look at our post about the simple steps to protect your privacy on social media.

(via Evening Standard)

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